4th of July journal prompts

Independence Day journal topics, patriotic writing prompts, 4th of July journal prompts

OH, say, can you write about Independence Day? Inspire family members young and old to ponder America’s founding with these 4th of July journal prompts.

1. Our Lives, Our Fortunes, & Our Sacred Honor

For more than a century, American colonists governed themselves according to conscience. Finally, in July 1776, fifty-six men signed the Declaration of Independence. Yet, they knew that freedom with self-government could cost their earthly fortunes and even their very lives. Write about a time when you were self-governed and followed your conscience, even though no one else told you the right thing to do.

2. The War for Independence: Eight Long Years

On December 19, 1777, George Washington and his Continental Army arrived at their winter camp site in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The discouraged army now faced a hard winter filled with disease and hunger. Imagine you are a patriot soldier at Valley Forge, with no shoes or blanket to call your own. Write about three reasons you will stay with General Washington instead of deserting the army.

3. No Tyrants Allowed

In 1787, the Framers of the Constitution of the United States instituted a wise system of government: Three branches of government–executive, legislative, and judicial–would ensure that powers remained divided, with a pattern of checks and balances. Compare and contrast a government of divided powers with a government of one absolute ruler.

4. Calling All Architects!

In 1792, Thomas Jefferson announced a design contest for the United States Capitol building. What would your entry have looked like? Draw your most impressive design for a Capitol building, and write a paragraph explaining the style and materials you have chosen.

5. You’re a Grand Old Flag

It’s 1837 and you live on a sprawling farm in the new state of Michigan. Write a letter to a friend and share your excitement over the new U.S. flag with a 26th star for Michigan. The flag will be official on July 4, 1837!

6. E Pluribus Unum

In 1873, an Act of Congress required the Latin phrase “E Pluribus Unum (Out of Many, One) to appear on all U.S. coins. Only eight years had passed since a devastating Civil War had ended with our nation still united as one. Today, as then, Americans have many differences but much in common. Write about two of these differences, and two things we all share.

7. Wings Like Eagles

The bald eagle has long been an emblem of the United States of America. The eagle can remind us of Isaiah 40:31, which says:

But those who wait on the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint.

Do you believe that nations and people who fear God and His laws will have new strength? Why or why not?

Hope you enjoy these 4th of July journal prompts. Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: Drew Myers, courtesy of Creative Commons.
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