Entries Tagged 'Holiday & Seasonal Ideas' ↓

More Mother’s Day writing activities

Mother's Day writing activities, acrostic poems, writing prompts, and card ideas children can make for Mom on her special day.

I’m guest blogging over at Home Educating Family, offering some Mother’s Day writing activities. Join me?

Whether it’s delivering breakfast in bed or creating a handmade card, your children’s hearts are filled up with you, their mama—and on your special day, they can’t wait to present you with their sweet offerings.

Many children, especially younger ones, are eager to bless you on Mother’s Day with something they’ve created themselves, but let’s be honest. Without guidance and direction, it probably won’t happen.

Take advantage of the days leading up to this celebratory Sunday. Why not set out a box of paper, writing tools, and craft supplies and encourage your children to write or create something special for you? They can fashion a crafty gift, write a sentimental letter or poem, or design a pretty card. No matter what they come up with, you’ll be one grateful and happy mom . . .

Read the complete article here and share these Mother’s Day writing activities with your family. Hope they take the bait and shower you with loving words and handmade cards on your special day!

For additional ideas, see last year’s Mother’s Day Writing Activities.

Copyright 2013 © by Kim Kautzer. All rights reserved.

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

The heart of Easter: 4 meaningful writing prompts

Easter Writing Prompts, Easter Journal Prompts

THIS WEEK, we hope you and your students will take time to reflect on the true meaning and joy of the season. Have a blessed Easter!

1. The First Easter

Imagine you have traveled back in time to the day Jesus rose from the grave. Describe what you might observe, experience, and feel. You may use your Bible to help you remember parts of the Easter story.

2. A New Commandment

In His life and death, Jesus taught us to love our enemies. Write about three ways you could show love to someone who hurts you or treats you wrongly.

3. Winter is Past

Signs of new life are everywhere in springtime! Describe something in nature that reminds you of Christ’s resurrection. A butterfly emerging from a cocoon, new leaves unfolding on a tree, and animals coming out of hibernation are possible ideas.

4. It’s a Miracle

Miracles and stories of hope are all around us. Do you remember Easter Sunday in 2009, when a ship captain was rescued from pirates who had held him hostage? Write about a miracle you hope to see this Easter, or a miracle your family has experienced in the past.

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: Jim & Rachel McArthur, courtesy of Creative Commons.

Fresh spring writing prompts your kids will love

writing prompts, journal prompts, flowers, rain, picnics

TODAY IS the first day of spring … and it’s the perfect time for children to fill their writing notebooks with the sights, smells, and sounds of the season!

1. If I Were a Daisy…

Choose any flower to describe yourself. Which did you choose and why?

2. Rain, Rain, Go Away!

Write about three things you could do on a rainy day.

3. A Bug’s Life

Imagine that your family has planned a picnic in the park. Describe this picnic from an insect’s point of view.

4. Hope Is the Thing with Feathers

It’s time to put your storytelling skills to work! Write a story using at least three of the following words: hen, egg, chick, airplane, goggles, parachute, hang glider, seeds.

5. Begin Again

Spring is a time of new beginnings. What advice would you give to a friend who has made mistakes in the past but wants to start fresh in life?

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Brrr! Writing prompts from the top of Big Snow Mountain

Winter Writing Prompts, Mountains, Snow, Snowboarding, Skiing, Journal Prompts

Before the last snows of winter melt, treat your students to writing exercises that will leave them shivering in their boots!

1. Extreme Sports

If you could spend a day in the mountains, would you rather go skiing, snowboarding, or rock climbing? Explain your answer.

2. Hibernating in Style

It’s official! Your cabin is open for business as a winter resort for mountain animals. Describe three of the furry guests at your resort, and some of their favorite vacation activities.

3. On a Dark and Stormy Night

Write a story that includes these words: avalanche, blindfold, and snow globe.

4. Everest Expedition

At 8,850 meters (or 29,035 feet) above sea level, Mount Everest is the highest mountain on earth. If you wanted to climb Mt. Everest on your 21st birthday, what steps would you take to prepare yourself physically, mentally, and financially?

5. Flying High

You have finally earned your pilot’s license, and today you are flying solo over a snow-capped mountain range. Describe your thoughts and feelings as you soar above this pristine landscape.

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: TRAILSOURCE.com, courtesy of Creative Commons.

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!

During the holidays, it’s always fun to take a break from your regular writing assignments and let the children have some fun with writing prompts. Try these on for size!

1. A Doggone Exciting Christmas

Pretend that you are a wriggly, wiggly, roly-poly puppy, and you have been chosen as a Christmas present for a boy or girl.

  • First, tell how you feel saying good-bye to your family.
  • Then, describe being placed in a box under the tree.
  • Finally, write about what it’s like to meet your new friend and owner.

2. Elf Life

You are an elf who works at the North Pole. Write a paragraph describing a typical workday.

3. Extreme Makeover, Christmas-Style

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!Your elderly neighbor’s holiday decorations always attract crowds. This year, unfortunately, she broke her leg and can’t decorate her house for Christmas. She has asked you to do it for her and has given you the cash you need to buy any supplies.

Decide on a theme, and describe what you will do to decorate her house.

4. How to Build a Snowman

Your pen pal in Hawaii has never seen snow. Write a letter to her explaining the steps to making a snowman.

5. Grounded!

Imagine that your family has made plans to visit relatives for the holidays. Write about what happens when flights are cancelled because of a blizzard, and you find yourselves stuck in the airport on Christmas Eve. Can your family make the best of a difficult situation?

6. It’s Traditional

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!Most families have special Christmas traditions. Write about one tradition your family enjoys. Does your mom bake a certain kind of cookie each year? Do you assemble shoe boxes filled with gifts for needy children? Chop down your own Christmas tree? Sing Christmas carols at a retirement home?

Describe this tradition, and explain how it first started (you may have to ask a parent or grandparent). Include some descriptive details.

Photos: John Mayer,  Iryna Yeroshko, and Young Rok Chang, courtesy of Creative Commons.

Christmas writing prompt…with a compassionate twist

Unique Christmas writing prompt gets kids thinking about what it would be like to receive a gift when you have nothing of your own

AT THIS time of year, my husband and I always look forward to poring through the gift catalogs that come in the mail.

Not the “gimmee” catalogs from Macy’s or Target or Pottery Barn, but the catalogs that come from such worthy organizations as World Vision, Compassion, and Samaritan’s Purse, offering us a chance to buy a really special, greatly appreciated gift for a child or family in need.

In the past, we’ve given chickens and ducks, a goat, and even the gift of clean drinking water for life.

Compassionate Giving

As a family, look through one of these online catalogs, and prayerfully consider giving a unique Christmas gift:

  • Domestic animals not only provide a steady stream of eggs or milk, but also bring a bit of income from selling the extras.
  • 5 fruit trees can give a poverty-stricken family a fresh start in fruit-tree farming.
  • A new soccer ball can replace the rounded wad of trash used as a makeshift ball by barefoot boys.
  • Just $35 can buy 10 times that amount in life-saving medicines.
  • Garden seeds will grow into a harvest that can sustain a family.

Compassionate Writing

As you look for ways to stir compassion in your children’s hearts, here’s a related writing activity to try. Whether or not you’re able to participate in compassionate giving, this Christmas writing prompt will get your kids thinking about what it would be like to receive a gift when you have little or nothing of your own.

  1. Visit the Compassion or World Vision website and read about several children who need sponsors. Choose one as the basis for your story.
  2. Browse through one of their online catalogs and choose a gift you think this child’s family would like to receive.
  3. Write two paragraphs. In the first paragraph, describe what daily life is like for this child in your own words. You may write in first person (imagining yourself to be the child) or in third person (as an outside observer or narrator).
  4. In the second paragraph, describe the child’s reaction to receiving their special gift.

The very best gift of all would be to actually sponsor one of these sweet children as a family! We’ve sponsored children both through Compassion and World Vision, and it has been a tremendous experience for us. Once you’ve become sponsors, you and your children can develop and foster a warm relationship with your sponsored child (and build important writing skills!) through regular letter-writing.

Do you already sponsor a child? Share your experience in the comments!

Photo: Erik Hersman, courtesy of Creative Commons.

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts

5 Fun Thanksgiving Writing Prompts

IT CAN get pretty hectic around the house in the days leading up to Thanksgiving. Instead of assigning your children their normal writing schoolwork, why not take a little break and let them choose one of these clever creative writing prompts? For added fun, have them read their stories after Thanksgiving dinner!

1. Gobble! Gobble! Tweet!

Imagine you are the Thanksgiving turkey. It is your good fortune to discover that the Farmer accidentally left the door to the house ajar. You sneak in unnoticed. Quickly, you find the computer and login to Twitter.

You have just enough time to type five tweets. What will you say to your followers in no more than 140 characters per tweet?

2. Invitation to Dinner

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kidsSuppose you can invite one special person, living or dead, to share your family’s Thanksgiving dinner this year. Would you choose a favorite relative who lives far away? A famous explorer you have studied in school? The Queen of England? Your best friend who moved away?

Think about who you would invite, and then write down 10 questions you would like to ask this person.

3. Thanksgiving Traditions

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kidsWhat does your family do for Thanksgiving? Do you host a big gathering at your house? Do you travel to another state to visit grandparents? Is Thanksgiving a small get-together, or is the house packed with friends and family? Who does the cooking? Does your family have traditions, such as playing games, watching football, or putting puzzles together?

Write about how you spend Thanksgiving, describing the sights, sounds, flavors, and aromas of the day. Use this Thanksgiving Word Bank if you need help thinking of strong, descriptive words.

4. Leaf Pile Adventure

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kidsAfter Thanksgiving dinner, you and your cousin decide to explore the neighborhood. At the end of the street, you notice a giant pile of leaves.

Together, you make a running start and leap right into the middle of the pile! Suddenly, the ground opens up beneath you, and you find yourselves sliding down a steep slide.

Write a story about what happens when you land at the bottom of the slide. Where are you? Include three different things that happen on your adventure, and conclude your story by telling how you and your cousin get back home.

5. A Feast of Favorites

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kids
At the first Thanksgiving, the Pilgrims and Indians ate foods such as wild turkey, venison, berries, squash, corn, roasted eels, and shellfish.

If you could go back in time to that historic event, what would you bring to share with your new friends? Make a list of 3-5 of your personal favorite Thanksgiving foods, and describe each one.

. . . . .

If you enjoyed these fun Thanksgiving writing prompts, be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photos: Mark DumontCliff, Kevin K, OakleyOriginals, and Steve Johnson courtesy of Creative Commons.

12 back-to-school writing prompts

back to school writing prompts

LOOKING FOR some fresh ways to ease your kids back into writing? These fun end-of-summer writing prompts will help them reflect on their summer without resorting to that tired, overused “How did you spend your summer vacation?”

  1. August is the only month that has no major holiday. Invent a new August holiday. How will people celebrate?
  2. Did you visit a new place for the first time this summer? Describe this place and tell how you felt about it.
  3. Think about your favorite activity from this past summer? What made it so much fun?
  4. Describe something you did this summer that involved water.
  5. Summer is a time for vacations, family reunions, and backyard parties. Write about something you did with a large group of people this summer.
  6. byke_boySummer is a great time to explore the out-of-doors. Did you spend time in nature this summer? Describe where you went and some things you did there.
  7. There’s one word that reminds almost everyone of summer: hot! Was your summer hot? What did you do to keep cool?
  8. Kids often get summer jobs. Did you? What were some things you did this summer to earn money?
  9. Write about something you did this summer that you have never done before.
  10. Write five words that describe your summer. Then tell why you chose each word.
  11. Describe something you did this summer to help someone in need.
  12. Write about a book you read this summer.
Photos: Vicki Watkins and Marius B, courtesy of Creative Commons.

July 4th writing prompts in a jar

July 4th writing prompts in a jar! Kids will write lists, letters, poems, and stories to celebrate fun, food, family, and freedom!

IT’S SUMMER. Your kids would rather ride bikes, toss a baseball, and run through the sprinklers than sit indoors “doing school.” Make writing time fun by taking clipboards, pencils, and papers outdoors, and inspire your kids with writing prompts that center on Independence Day.

  1. Copy, paste, and print out (or handwrite) the following prompts on red, white, and blue paper strips. Place them in a jar.
  2. Have each child draw two slips of paper from the jar.
  3. Ask them to choose their favorite of the two. If you have a reluctant child, set the timer for 15 minutes.

Voila! A patriotic, short-and-sweet summer writing activity!

July 4th Writing Prompts

My Freedoms

What does freedom mean to you? List five ways you can exercise your freedom.

Parade Float

You have been invited to design a float for the 4th of July parade. In one word, what will be the theme of your float? Explain how you will express this theme through decorations, costumes, and music.

Word Bank Story

Write a story using words from this Independence Day word bank.

Message in the Sky

Imagine watching a fireworks show with your family. In a burst of red, white, and blue, an urgent message suddenly appears in the night sky. What does it say? What will you do?

Story Fun

Write a story using these words: watermelon, fireworks, parade, thunderstorm, splash, race, tunnel, cousins, bicycle, dog. (Let younger children choose just 3-5 of these words for their story.)

Mouthwatering Menu

Plan the perfect 4th of July barbecue or picnic. Make a list of foods you would serve. Then, choose one or two and describe them in detail to make them sound as tempting and mouth-watering as possible.

It’s Been One of Those Days

Imagine a 4th of July celebration that is filled with mishaps. Write a story that tells about three things that go wrong.

Dear Pen Pal

Write a letter to an imaginary friend who lives in another country. Explain why we celebrate Independence Day, and describe five things you like about living in America.

It’s a Tradition!

Write about your family’s 4th of July traditions. Where do you go? What activities do you do? What foods do you enjoy?

Acrostic

  • Create an acrostic:
  • Vertically on your paper, write either “INDEPENDENCE DAY” or “FOURTH OF JULY.”
  • Next to each letter, write a word, phrase, or sentence related to the holiday’s history or your family traditions. (For example, “J” could be Jefferson, Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence, or Juicy watermelon.)

Bonus!

Visit BusyTeacher.org for a collection of Independence Day printables and worksheets including 4th of July finger puppets, Old Glory worksheet, and a color-and-cut 4th of July visor!

Did you enjoy these writing ideas? If so, be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: breakmake, courtesy of Creative Commons.

5 summer writing activities from Pinterest

LOOKING FOR ways to keep your children {productively} occupied this summer without actually assigning schoolwork? Look no further! You can find tons of great summer writing activities from Pinterest.

Here are five fun Pinterest projects you can suggest to help stave off boredom.

1. Make Your Own Comic Book

Got boys? They’ll love these 10 tips for making their own comic books!

writing activities from pinterest, make comic book

2. Create Your Own Word Art

Using Microsoft Word, your kids can create word art in the shape of their choice. Encourage them to choose words that fit a theme, such as jungle words, summer words, or family words.

For added writing fun, invite them instead to use the text of a poem or short story they’ve written, highlighting key words in bright colors and interesting fonts.

writing activities from pinterest, word art

3. Write Eraser Stories

Collectible Japanese erasers come in loads of fun shapes, but you can also find budget-friendly $1 packs of cute mini erasers at places like Michael’s. Pick up an assortment and set your kids to writing eraser stories!

This engaging activity helps your child choose characters and situations as story starters so they can create a simple yet fun story. If you have a pre-writer (or a reluctant one!), make this an oral activity in which you write the story as your child spins his yarn.

eraser stories, summer writing activities, pinterest

4. Make an Inchie Book

Who doesn’t love miniature things? Combine arts and crafts with writing and encourge your kids to turn their tiny stories into tiny books!

writing activities from pinterest, make inchie book, tiny books, make a book

5. Make a Step Book

Step books are especially fun for younger children, as they lend themselves beautifully to counting books. Work together with a preschooler to create a step book just for him. Even better, suggest that your older kids make a step book for a younger sibling!

pinterest, writing activities from pinterest, step books, summer writing fun, summer writing activities, making books

Follow my Pinterest boards and explore my blog for even more writing ideas!

Your Turn!

What are some of your favorite Pinterest writing activities for kids? Feel free to share links in the comments!

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