Entries Tagged 'Holiday & Seasonal Ideas' ↓

Patriotic 4th of July Journal Prompts

Independence Day journal topics, patriotic writing prompts, 4th of July journal prompts

OH, say, can you write about Independence Day? Inspire family members young and old to ponder America’s founding with these 4th of July journal prompts.

1. Our Lives, Our Fortunes, & Our Sacred Honor

For more than a century, American colonists governed themselves according to conscience. Finally, in July 1776, fifty-six men signed the Declaration of Independence. Yet, they knew that freedom with self-government could cost their earthly fortunes and even their very lives. Write about a time when you were self-governed and followed your conscience, even though no one else told you the right thing to do.

2. The War for Independence: Eight Long Years

On December 19, 1777, George Washington and his Continental Army arrived at their winter camp site in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The discouraged army now faced a hard winter filled with disease and hunger. Imagine you are a patriot soldier at Valley Forge, with no shoes or blanket to call your own. Write about three reasons you will stay with General Washington instead of deserting the army.

3. No Tyrants Allowed

In 1787, the Framers of the Constitution of the United States instituted a wise system of government: Three branches of government–executive, legislative, and judicial–would ensure that powers remained divided, with a pattern of checks and balances. Compare and contrast a government of divided powers with a government of one absolute ruler.

4. Calling All Architects!

In 1792, Thomas Jefferson announced a design contest for the United States Capitol building. What would your entry have looked like? Draw your most impressive design for a Capitol building, and write a paragraph explaining the style and materials you have chosen.

5. You’re a Grand Old Flag

It’s 1837 and you live on a sprawling farm in the new state of Michigan. Write a letter to a friend and share your excitement over the new U.S. flag with a 26th star for Michigan. The flag will be official on July 4, 1837!

6. E Pluribus Unum

In 1873, an Act of Congress required the Latin phrase “E Pluribus Unum (Out of Many, One) to appear on all U.S. coins. Only eight years had passed since a devastating Civil War had ended with our nation still united as one. Today, as then, Americans have many differences but much in common. Write about two of these differences, and two things we all share.

7. Wings Like Eagles

The bald eagle has long been an emblem of the United States of America. The eagle can remind us of Isaiah 40:31, which says:

But those who wait on the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint.

Do you believe that nations and people who fear God and His laws will have new strength? Why or why not?

Hope you enjoy these 4th of July journal prompts. Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: Drew Myers, courtesy of Creative Commons.

7 Father’s Day journal prompts

Father's Day, journal prompts, writing prompts

Whether writing the inside of a card for Dad, or journaling about the special man in their life, your kids are sure to find inspiration with these Father’s Day journal prompts. From our family to yours, happy Father’s Day!

1. Remember When?

What is your earliest memory of your dad? Use your five senses to describe the people and items in the scene.

2. Ask Dad

What was the best piece of advice your father ever gave you? Write about the effect his words and example have had on your life.

3. Perfect Fit

Choose one item to describe your dad. Is it a saxophone? Mechanical pencil? Bicycle? Hammer? Camp stove? Write about why you chose this item to represent him.

4. Shh! It’s a Surprise!

If you could plan a surprise vacation for Dad, what would it be like? Who would go on this trip, and where would they go? Describe the kind of hotel (or tent) your dad would stay in and the activities he would do.

5. Way, Way Back, Many Centuries Ago…

Do you have a photo of your dad when he was  your age? Describe his appearance in the photo, including his clothing styles and facial expression. Explain the action he was doing when someone clicked the camera.

6. Any Dream Will Do

What is your father’s vision for his family? What are his goals for his marriage and his dreams for his children? If you’re not sure, sit down and ask him. Write down his answers and ways your family can work together to make these dreams a reality.

7. Thank You

Write about why you are grateful to have a father in your life. Include at least three reasons you’re thankful for him!

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: Chris Parfitt, courtesy of Creative Commons.

10 Mother’s Day writing prompts

Mother's Day writing prompts, Mother's Day journal prompts

WRITING WARM-UPS are always a good idea, even more so at this cherished time of year. These Mother’s Day writing prompts will draw your family together and set pens and pencils in motion!

Descriptive Mother’s Day Writing Prompts

1. Do you notice any similarities between your mother and your grandmother? Describe the personality traits, character qualities, or physical attributes they share.

2. Describe a piece of jewelry that your mother always wears. What makes this piece of jewelry so special to her?

3. Describe a talent, interest, or hobby that makes your mother different from every other mom you know.

4. Think of your mother’s voice when she sings a special song or shares a favorite verse with you. Write three similes for her voice at these times. Is it as soft as a summer wind or as musical as choir of bells?

5. Describe your mother’s decorating style. Use your best adjectives, and include the senses of sight, smell, and touch.

6. Write a color poem to describe your mother. Choose a color, and write three or four similes comparing your mother to things of that color, such as: 

“My Mother Is Yellow”

My mother’s face is as bright as the mid-day sun.

She holds her head high, like a bold sunflower.

Her heart is as cheerful as a field of yellow daisies.

My mother is a treasure, like shiny nuggets of gold.

Other Mother’s Day Writing Prompts

1. Does your mother have a nickname for you? Where did she get that name?

2. Is there a story behind your mother’s name? Ask her why she received her first and middle names. Does she have a nickname?

3. What do you think a perfect day for your mother would be like? Write about one thing you could do to help make that wonderful, imaginary day become a reality.

4. What do you think it means to have a beautiful heart?

 

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo © Karah Fredricks. Used by permission.

 

More Mother’s Day writing activities

Mother's Day writing activities, acrostic poems, writing prompts, and card ideas children can make for Mom on her special day.

I’m guest blogging over at Home Educating Family, offering some Mother’s Day writing activities. Join me?

Whether it’s delivering breakfast in bed or creating a handmade card, your children’s hearts are filled up with you, their mama—and on your special day, they can’t wait to present you with their sweet offerings.

Many children, especially younger ones, are eager to bless you on Mother’s Day with something they’ve created themselves, but let’s be honest. Without guidance and direction, it probably won’t happen.

Take advantage of the days leading up to this celebratory Sunday. Why not set out a box of paper, writing tools, and craft supplies and encourage your children to write or create something special for you? They can fashion a crafty gift, write a sentimental letter or poem, or design a pretty card. No matter what they come up with, you’ll be one grateful and happy mom . . .

Read the complete article here and share these Mother’s Day writing activities with your family. Hope they take the bait and shower you with loving words and handmade cards on your special day!

For additional ideas, see last year’s Mother’s Day Writing Activities.

Copyright 2013 © by Kim Kautzer. All rights reserved.

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

The heart of Easter: 4 meaningful writing prompts

Easter Writing Prompts, Easter Journal Prompts

THIS WEEK, we hope you and your students will take time to reflect on the true meaning and joy of the season. Have a blessed Easter!

1. The First Easter

Imagine you have traveled back in time to the day Jesus rose from the grave. Describe what you might observe, experience, and feel. You may use your Bible to help you remember parts of the Easter story.

2. A New Commandment

In His life and death, Jesus taught us to love our enemies. Write about three ways you could show love to someone who hurts you or treats you wrongly.

3. Winter is Past

Signs of new life are everywhere in springtime! Describe something in nature that reminds you of Christ’s resurrection. A butterfly emerging from a cocoon, new leaves unfolding on a tree, and animals coming out of hibernation are possible ideas.

4. It’s a Miracle

Miracles and stories of hope are all around us. Do you remember Easter Sunday in 2009, when a ship captain was rescued from pirates who had held him hostage? Write about a miracle you hope to see this Easter, or a miracle your family has experienced in the past.

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: Jim & Rachel McArthur, courtesy of Creative Commons.

Fresh spring writing prompts your kids will love

writing prompts, journal prompts, flowers, rain, picnics

TODAY IS the first day of spring … and it’s the perfect time for children to fill their writing notebooks with the sights, smells, and sounds of the season!

1. If I Were a Daisy…

Choose any flower to describe yourself. Which did you choose and why?

2. Rain, Rain, Go Away!

Write about three things you could do on a rainy day.

3. A Bug’s Life

Imagine that your family has planned a picnic in the park. Describe this picnic from an insect’s point of view.

4. Hope Is the Thing with Feathers

It’s time to put your storytelling skills to work! Write a story using at least three of the following words: hen, egg, chick, airplane, goggles, parachute, hang glider, seeds.

5. Begin Again

Spring is a time of new beginnings. What advice would you give to a friend who has made mistakes in the past but wants to start fresh in life?

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Brrr! Writing prompts from the top of Big Snow Mountain

Winter Writing Prompts, Mountains, Snow, Snowboarding, Skiing, Journal Prompts

Before the last snows of winter melt, treat your students to writing exercises that will leave them shivering in their boots!

1. Extreme Sports

If you could spend a day in the mountains, would you rather go skiing, snowboarding, or rock climbing? Explain your answer.

2. Hibernating in Style

It’s official! Your cabin is open for business as a winter resort for mountain animals. Describe three of the furry guests at your resort, and some of their favorite vacation activities.

3. On a Dark and Stormy Night

Write a story that includes these words: avalanche, blindfold, and snow globe.

4. Everest Expedition

At 8,850 meters (or 29,035 feet) above sea level, Mount Everest is the highest mountain on earth. If you wanted to climb Mt. Everest on your 21st birthday, what steps would you take to prepare yourself physically, mentally, and financially?

5. Flying High

You have finally earned your pilot’s license, and today you are flying solo over a snow-capped mountain range. Describe your thoughts and feelings as you soar above this pristine landscape.

Be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photo: TRAILSOURCE.com, courtesy of Creative Commons.

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!

During the holidays, it’s always fun to take a break from your regular writing assignments and let the children have some fun with writing prompts. Try these on for size!

1. A Doggone Exciting Christmas

Pretend that you are a wriggly, wiggly, roly-poly puppy, and you have been chosen as a Christmas present for a boy or girl.

  • First, tell how you feel saying good-bye to your family.
  • Then, describe being placed in a box under the tree.
  • Finally, write about what it’s like to meet your new friend and owner.

2. Elf Life

You are an elf who works at the North Pole. Write a paragraph describing a typical workday.

3. Extreme Makeover, Christmas-Style

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!Your elderly neighbor’s holiday decorations always attract crowds. This year, unfortunately, she broke her leg and can’t decorate her house for Christmas. She has asked you to do it for her and has given you the cash you need to buy any supplies.

Decide on a theme, and describe what you will do to decorate her house.

4. How to Build a Snowman

Your pen pal in Hawaii has never seen snow. Write a letter to her explaining the steps to making a snowman.

5. Grounded!

Imagine that your family has made plans to visit relatives for the holidays. Write about what happens when flights are cancelled because of a blizzard, and you find yourselves stuck in the airport on Christmas Eve. Can your family make the best of a difficult situation?

6. It’s Traditional

6 Christmas journal prompts that make writing merrier!Most families have special Christmas traditions. Write about one tradition your family enjoys. Does your mom bake a certain kind of cookie each year? Do you assemble shoe boxes filled with gifts for needy children? Chop down your own Christmas tree? Sing Christmas carols at a retirement home?

Describe this tradition, and explain how it first started (you may have to ask a parent or grandparent). Include some descriptive details.

Photos: John Mayer,  Iryna Yeroshko, and Young Rok Chang, courtesy of Creative Commons.

Christmas writing prompt…with a compassionate twist

Unique Christmas writing prompt gets kids thinking about what it would be like to receive a gift when you have nothing of your own

AT THIS time of year, my husband and I always look forward to poring through the gift catalogs that come in the mail.

Not the “gimmee” catalogs from Macy’s or Target or Pottery Barn, but the catalogs that come from such worthy organizations as World Vision, Compassion, and Samaritan’s Purse, offering us a chance to buy a really special, greatly appreciated gift for a child or family in need.

In the past, we’ve given chickens and ducks, a goat, and even the gift of clean drinking water for life.

Compassionate Giving

As a family, look through one of these online catalogs, and prayerfully consider giving a unique Christmas gift:

  • Domestic animals not only provide a steady stream of eggs or milk, but also bring a bit of income from selling the extras.
  • 5 fruit trees can give a poverty-stricken family a fresh start in fruit-tree farming.
  • A new soccer ball can replace the rounded wad of trash used as a makeshift ball by barefoot boys.
  • Just $35 can buy 10 times that amount in life-saving medicines.
  • Garden seeds will grow into a harvest that can sustain a family.

Compassionate Writing

As you look for ways to stir compassion in your children’s hearts, here’s a related writing activity to try. Whether or not you’re able to participate in compassionate giving, this Christmas writing prompt will get your kids thinking about what it would be like to receive a gift when you have little or nothing of your own.

  1. Visit the Compassion or World Vision website and read about several children who need sponsors. Choose one as the basis for your story.
  2. Browse through one of their online catalogs and choose a gift you think this child’s family would like to receive.
  3. Write two paragraphs. In the first paragraph, describe what daily life is like for this child in your own words. You may write in first person (imagining yourself to be the child) or in third person (as an outside observer or narrator).
  4. In the second paragraph, describe the child’s reaction to receiving their special gift.

The very best gift of all would be to actually sponsor one of these sweet children as a family! We’ve sponsored children both through Compassion and World Vision, and it has been a tremendous experience for us. Once you’ve become sponsors, you and your children can develop and foster a warm relationship with your sponsored child (and build important writing skills!) through regular letter-writing.

Do you already sponsor a child? Share your experience in the comments!

Photo: Erik Hersman, courtesy of Creative Commons.

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts

5 Fun Thanksgiving Writing Prompts

IT CAN get pretty hectic around the house in the days leading up to Thanksgiving. Instead of assigning your children their normal writing schoolwork, why not take a little break and let them choose one of these clever creative writing prompts? For added fun, have them read their stories after Thanksgiving dinner!

1. Gobble! Gobble! Tweet!

Imagine you are the Thanksgiving turkey. It is your good fortune to discover that the Farmer accidentally left the door to the house ajar. You sneak in unnoticed. Quickly, you find the computer and login to Twitter.

You have just enough time to type five tweets. What will you say to your followers in no more than 140 characters per tweet?

2. Invitation to Dinner

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kidsSuppose you can invite one special person, living or dead, to share your family’s Thanksgiving dinner this year. Would you choose a favorite relative who lives far away? A famous explorer you have studied in school? The Queen of England? Your best friend who moved away?

Think about who you would invite, and then write down 10 questions you would like to ask this person.

3. Thanksgiving Traditions

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kidsWhat does your family do for Thanksgiving? Do you host a big gathering at your house? Do you travel to another state to visit grandparents? Is Thanksgiving a small get-together, or is the house packed with friends and family? Who does the cooking? Does your family have traditions, such as playing games, watching football, or putting puzzles together?

Write about how you spend Thanksgiving, describing the sights, sounds, flavors, and aromas of the day. Use this Thanksgiving Word Bank if you need help thinking of strong, descriptive words.

4. Leaf Pile Adventure

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kidsAfter Thanksgiving dinner, you and your cousin decide to explore the neighborhood. At the end of the street, you notice a giant pile of leaves.

Together, you make a running start and leap right into the middle of the pile! Suddenly, the ground opens up beneath you, and you find yourselves sliding down a steep slide.

Write a story about what happens when you land at the bottom of the slide. Where are you? Include three different things that happen on your adventure, and conclude your story by telling how you and your cousin get back home.

5. A Feast of Favorites

5 {fun} Thanksgiving writing prompts for kids
At the first Thanksgiving, the Pilgrims and Indians ate foods such as wild turkey, venison, berries, squash, corn, roasted eels, and shellfish.

If you could go back in time to that historic event, what would you bring to share with your new friends? Make a list of 3-5 of your personal favorite Thanksgiving foods, and describe each one.

. . . . .

If you enjoyed these fun Thanksgiving writing prompts, be sure to check back each week for more Writing Prompt Wednesdays!

Photos: Mark DumontCliff, Kevin K, OakleyOriginals, and Steve Johnson courtesy of Creative Commons.
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